LETTERS FROM READERS: ” HOW I LOVE THOSE BOERS!”

 

 

 

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Article compiled  by: White Nation  correspondent Pretoria  – April 29  2017

 

 

 

SOUTH AFRICA– FAILED LAND OF COMMUNIST ANC ORGANIZED CRIME ,LIBFARTS, UNION CHAOS , MISDIRECTED RAINBOW MONKEYS – AND WHITE GENOCIDE

 

 

A Letter From An American Living In South Africa For The Past 7 Years

 

” I confess when I first moved to South Africa I thought Afrikaners were the bad guys”

Because I was never required to study African history in school, I knew only what the American media had taught me, which was that Afrikaners (Boer Nation) were responsible for Apartheid and therefore the bad guys. Six months after moving here, I realized how incorrect my initial assumptions were. Everyone in South Africa is both a “bad guy” and a “good guy”, and so it is with the rest of the world (for such is human nature).

The following two years were spent reading every book I could get my hands on regarding South Africa. If one wants to understand a culture, I reasoned, then one must study their art, music, literature, cuisine, and history. And so I did just that – not only for the Boer culture, but for other South African cultures as well.

At the end of those two years, I felt a keen remorse for having been so arrogant in the beginning. I now knew enough to understand that I knew very little, if anything. I enrolled in university (again) to study pastoral counselling, with the intent of learning how to listen and ask better questions. After I finished my studies, I enrolled in another three-year program to study spiritual accompaniment, which teaches one how to journey with people on a spiritual level as they wrestle with issues of faith. I have two years left of this course, which brings me to the present moment.

Having lived in South Africa for seven years now, my desire is to walk humbly and respectfully with the people here, to forever be a student of the land, languages and cultures, and to serve where I can to help build this nation. This nation, however, will never reach its potential so long as any one people group is being marginalized or oppressed. The point of this letter is to share with you what I have observed among the Boers, as well as my hopes and dreams for them.

In the seven years I have had the privilege to live in South Africa, I have come to love the Boers. I love all of the cultures here – truly I do – but there is a soft spot in my heart for the Boers. Not because I am also white, certainly not because I am racist, but because I see the strengths of their culture, and I believe those strengths should be celebrated. Boers have an amazing ability to persevere despite the odds. Boers have a strong work ethic. They also have a unique ability to improvise, make do, and find a way around their obstacles (‘n Boer maak ‘n plan!).

I have learned much from the Boer culture. One thing that especially touches me is the way Boers pray. In the seven years that I have been here, nearly every prayer I have heard begins with “Dankie, Here”. To begin a prayer with heartfelt thanks despite present challenges is something that moves me deeply. In my own culture people nearly always being prayers with, “Dear God, would You please do such and such…?” I no longer pray that way, and I have the Boers to thank for that.

Another thing that I admire is the concept of a “lekker kuier”. It is more than a visit, more than a quick cup of tea, and can often interrupt schedules or to-do lists. In a kuier I am welcomed, heard, given priority over time’s looming deadlines, and valued. It doesn’t matter if my house is messy, my hair is not perfect, or what my plan for the day was. I thought I knew what hospitality was before I moved to South Africa, but I was wrong. I learned about hospitality from many a kuier, and I have the Boers to thank for that.

One of my favourite things about Boers is the Afrikaans language itself. I studied German and American Sign Language in school, but I confess that learning another language as a middle-aged woman was a bit daunting. Even so, as an immigrant I believe it is respectful to learn the language of one’s host country. I chose Afrikaans to begin with because my children have to learn it in school, and I wanted to be able to help them with their homework. And what a delightfully descriptive language! With words like “spookasem”, “stofsuier” and “trapsuutjies”, how can one not love Afrikaans? It is a young language, it does not have a large vocabulary, but it is marvelously expressive and inventive. I came to appreciate the Bible all over again after I began to read it in Afrikaans, and I have the Boers to thank for that.

I long for the day when Boers can hold their heads high and be proud of their culture and their heritage. I long for future generations to be in awe of their ancestors who fought bravely in the Anglo-Boer war or contributed toward the many inventions that are uniquely South African. I long for the Afrikaans language to persevere and continue to be relevant. I also long for the day when they no longer have to apologize for being Afrikaans but can celebrate their contribution to this great nation. No one should have to be ashamed of their culture or ethnicity, no matter what happened in the past.

I would like to end this letter by saying the following to the Boer people: I see you. I value you. And I would like to respectfully journey with you in helping this nation to reach its great potential.”

AnnieErickson001

Annie Erickson

 

 

SOURCE:

A letter From An American living In South Africa

 

 

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