A GLIMPSE INTO HISTORY: A TRIBUTE TO OUR SOUTH WEST AFRICAN BUSH/BORDER WAR VETERANS AND A SALUTE TO OUR UNSUNG HEROES

 

 

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Article compiled and posted by: White Nation correspondent Pretoria  August 19   2019

 

 

HISTORY

 

IN this special article we bring you the legacy  of South Africa’s bravest white, black , Colored and Indian warriors. We bring you the memories of a time when South Africa faced a conflict against many odds- but were defended by young giants who’s pride was greater than their fear. We sincerely want to remind you of a tale when heroes walk among men and a war the communist ANC rubble conveniently want you to forget- the tale of the South West African bush war.

We want our veterans- now all in their 50’s and 60’s-  to take a walk down memory lane and we want to  tell the story to our young boys and girls of today’s junk generation of hoodies and X-Boxes what their parents did and sacrificed for a country and liberal serpents that now abandoned them as “outcasts” . This is a story the communist dirt bags now conveniently left out of history books and school curriculum.  This is a short reminder  about  a bunch of young 19-year old school cadets that took on some of  the most powerful and sophisticated nations in the world on the battlefield all at once – and defeated them for more than 25 long years – only to be sold out by their own white political dirty leaders back home.

This is the sad story of many soldiers and women who sacrificed  their lives for freedom- only to be sold out to the same enemy they were fighting against by their own dirty politicians- and to be murdered on a grand scale 30 years later in a silent white genocide already planned long ago. In conclusion was this whole long war and all the sacrifices in vain- for the only victors were those same terrorists that were defeated on the battlefield – together with the dirty politicians back home, their corporate vultures that bank rolled them – the Jews  and their liberal white sell-outs that cavorted with the enemy in 5 star hotels while our sons and daughters were killed in a pseudo war that benefited the international and local companies winning billions of dollars worth of military contracts. This is the story that is supposed not to be told.

Shane Yates wrote in his memoirs:

Today 35 years ago, I was 18 years old, sitting in the open door of a Puma Helicopter, flying fast, just above the trees in Angola. Suddenly anti-aircraft tracer bullets blasted around us, and the helicopter flying next to me was struck and crashed. Twelve fellow paratroopers (Parabats) and three helicopter crew were killed. I remember that day like it was yesterday!
Rest in peace fellow soldiers. Never forgotten…

Today we stand to attention, remove headdress and pause to remember the 3 SAAF Helicopter Crewmen and 12 Airborne Brothers from 1 Parachute Battalion who made the supreme sacrifice during Ops Meebos on 09 August 1982 when their Aerospatiale SA330C Puma, Serial Number 132 was shot down by enemy 14,5mm ZPU-1 anti-aircraft guns south-east of Cuvelai in Southern Angola.

The Puma Helicopter 132 Crew were:

73275349PK Captain John Guy Twaddle (Pilot & Aircraft Commander). He was 25. (31 Sqn)
7635461PE Lieutenant Christian Wilhelm Pietersen (Co-Pilot). He was 22. (31 Sqn)
67428813PE Flight Sergeant Coert Nicolaas Grobler (Flight Engineer). He was 31. (19 Sqn)
1 Parachute Battalion Passengers:
77419422BG Rifleman Russell Hilton Barrett. He was 20.
79232518BG Rifleman Alan De Klerk. He was 19.
78366077BG Lance Corporal Stephen Richard Hoare. He was 19.
76275536BG Rifleman Anton Kruger. He was 21.
78457256BG Rifleman Grant William Krull. He was 20.
76336700BG Rifleman Martin le Roux. He was 21.
78345949BG Corporal Esuas Philluppus Lombard. He was 19.
77255379BG Rifleman Shane Patrick Mallon. He was 20.
78456035BG Rifleman James Thomas Marshall. He was 19.
78473790BG Rifleman Craig Andrew Moody. He was 20.
78412871BG Rifleman Andries Hermias van Niekerk. He was 19.
78567005BG Rifleman Andre Wolmarans. He was 20.

Their names and sacrifice have not been forgotten.

Details of the puma chopper that was shot down with the 12 Bats and the 3 SAAF, here is the account of the day written by Gen Roland de Vries:

A Tragic 9 August 1982 — We Loose Fifteen Splendid Soldiers in One Swell Swoop

9 August 1982. A crisp winter’s morning in southern Angola with nothing much really happening. 61 Mech was still in an ambush position to the east of the Cuvelai-Techamutete road, somewhere close to the Mui River. New intelligence had been received of a small SWAPO logistics base close to Techamutete. An attack was considered by the TAC HQ. It was however realized that FAPLA could interfere and the idea was scrapped. The frustrations relating to the finding of the next viable target was now the thing bedevilling the momentum and continuation of Meebos. Was the search and destroy show petering out already?

Captain Willem Ratte and the scouts of 32 Battalion were eagerly searching for the infamous “Bravo Battalion”  of SWAPO — the main enemy 61 Mech had sought and had a few skirmishes with during Operation Daisy in November 1981. They were still out there, roaming the bush. Lost in the same wilderness were the Central and Eastern Area HQs of SWAPO. Don’t forget about the other loose assortments of SWAPO running around in the bush.
Where the hell is the enemy, in six figure map grid reference’s terms…? Show yourself damn it! The target search by Ratte had now shifted to an area to the north-west of Cuvelai. It was within two hour’s striking distance from where 61 Mech was influencing the road leading north to Techamutete from Cuvelai. The signs and the symptoms of the enemy were there — the signs had been found by Ratte on the ground. The TAC HQ decided to launch an area operation into the suspect area: fly in with Puma helicopters, patrol, and wish for a number of lucky strikes with the enemy, fly out again, tally-ho. The recipe was the same; the Alouette gunships would provide close air-support. Hopefully as well, during the flying the gunships would pick up the enemy on the ground. Eight Pumas were poised for the trooping mission of the splendid soldiers of 32 Battalion and 1 Parachute Battalion. Ready to go.

Just after midday the Pumas started flying in the troops to the target zone just north of the Mui River about 15km to the west of the Cuvelai-Techamutete road. The route chosen took the aircraft flying along the dry river bed of the Mui River. The flying pathway of the Pumas from the HAA almost took them over the deployment position of 61 Mech hidden in the bushes below. With their first flight, the Pumas had unwittingly flown over a deployed SWAPO anti-aircraft position. The enemy was lurking in a bushy patch of the Mui River approximately 15km west of the Cuvelai-Techamutete road. The second time around, at about 15h00, four Pumas again came with a flurry…Again along the dry Mui River with their precious cargo on the way to a landing zone. A curtain of enemy anti-aircraft fire suddenly erupted from below and slammed into the second Puma piloted by Captain John Twaddle. The Puma plummeted to the ground, exploded and burst into flames. Three SAAF crew members and twelve paratroopers were killed instantly — no, for a brief moment one of the paratroopers was still alive.This was an amazing tragedy. 9 August 1982… We had lost fifteen splendid soldiers in one swell swoop.

Soon after the Alouette gunships went into action. More than thirty SWAPO soldiers running towards the crash site were spotted. A battle ensued and some of the Alouettes took hits from below. One Alouette pilot reported seeing more than hundred SWAPO insurgents dancing around the stricken Puma. More gunships were scrambled and were on their way to the contact site. By this time the TAC HQ had informed 61 Mech about the unfolding tragedy in the Mui River. We immediately responded and started moving at best speed towards the position we knew were the fight with SWAPO and the gunships were raging. 61 Mech was approximately 23km to the east. Time and distance wise it would take our vanguard close on one hour of bundu bashing to get there. Move! Move! Move!

The battle was still raging at the downed Puma site. The Alouettes were taking fire from SWAPO’s formidable 14,5s and SAM-7s. The gunships needed to return to the HAA to re-arm and re-fuel. At this stage Captain Willem Ratte was still deployed further to the north, close to the Calonga River searching for enemy bases. 61 Mech reached the crash site within little more than an hour. As we deployed in an all-round defensive open leaguer around the crash site we could hear a mini-battle raging just to the north of our position. My first instruction was for all of 61 Mech to remain extremely alert and to stay mounted on their Ratels until I had assessed the situation. I halted my Ratel next to the Puma helicopter, which was still smouldering. Looking down into the wreck we could see a number of charred remains of the paratroopers. It was obvious that nobody could be alive. However, our biggest fear was that the enemy could have captured someone.

On the command radio-net I then reiterated my command for everyone to remain mounted on their vehicles. As this was as much an army as an air force show, SAAF Major Jaap du Preez and I dismounted to inspect the blazing sight and analyse what had happened — our fear remained the possibility that soldiers have been captured. About fifty metres to the north we could see where the 14,5s had been positioned — the area was strewn with empty shell cases. The whole area was covered with the chevron boot print of SWAPO. Of the enemy themselves there was no sign at this stage. Realizing that SWAPO expected us visiting the site, Jaap du Preez and I looked at each other and sort of simultaneously warned: “Watch out for booby-traps and personnel mines.” It was an eerie situation…”

The three SAAF crew members had clearly been removed from the wreck by SWAPO soldiers. The three bodies were propped up in their seats as if someone had posed them for a photograph in their scorched flying suits. Incidentally: In a contact with the enemy a day later a few Polaroid photographs were found on dead SWAPO insurgents, as well as some of the “dog tags” (two metal identification disks worn around the neck) of the paratroopers. As I stood next to the wreck I momentarily felt an immense sadness, a heavy weight settling on my chest… silent crying. I was thinking of those back home who did not yet know what had happened in the Mui on this fateful 9th of August 1982. My pondering did not last long as I was interrupted by a Ratel-90 approaching the crash site. Close to me lay one of the doors of the Puma which had been blown to one side.

The approaching Ratel-90 belonged to Second Lieutenant Dewald Weideman, one of the troop commanders of Captain Chris du Toit of Charlie Squadron. Weideman dismounted and started walking in my direction… Why? Chris du Toit shouted at him to get back on his Ratel. As I put up my hand and echoed the warning to halt him, there was a tremendous explosion right in front of me. Weideman was flung into the air, one foot and the bottom part of his torso was blown to bits, but our man was alive… Medics! Doctor! Medics! Quick! Call for a Puma Casevac now! Again I shouted: “No one, but NO ONE get off your Ratels! Repeat my message down the chain of command now, AGAIN!” There was an eerie respectful silence that enshrouded the death site.

Jaap du Preez and I then found a drag mark from the Puma wreck to a lonely tree approximately thirty yards away. We could see the body of one of the paratroopers propped up against the stem of a Mopani tree. We walked very carefully towards the site, searching the earth for signs of booby-traps or personnel mines. The paratrooper was dead, he must have been alive for a while, probably thrown from the Puma by the explosion. His skin was blistered and hung in tatters from him. The pain must have been excruciating. He was shot through the centre of his forehead — was this a coup de grace by the enemy? Jaap du Preez and I returned to the wreck and started counting the bodies. We repeated the count six times to make very sure that all had been accounted for. We then confirmed our counts.

I then instructed one of the Ratels to drive towards the Puma wreck and for our soldiers to carefully transfer the remains into body-bags. The body-bags were not enough and some of the charred remains had to share bags. A Puma was called in to fly the remains to the HAA and then back to SWA. 61 Mech then left the Puma site and to leaguer a few kilometres to the north of the Mui River for the night. We would return the next day to evacuate the helicopter wreck — we were definitely not going to leave it for SWAPO to use for propaganda purposes later on. Sadness permeated the leaguer of 61 Mech as the sun set in the west over the Calonga River. Somewhere out there was Captain Willem Ratte and his scouts and the enemy in the darkness.

That night Major Alex Britz made our command group a “Potjie” (typical African stew prepared in a Falkirk three-legged cast-iron pot). He had made a deep hole in the ground for his fire so that the glow could not be discerned by any watchful enemy. We sat on our camp chairs in the bush in camaraderie, surrounded by darkness and the silence from within.
At midnight I was called to the radio by my signals officer Captain Sean MacSweeny. It was the TAC HQ. They had sifted through the remains of our slain soldiers and could only find signs of fourteen. One was missing. I replied: “No ways, check again.” Captain Jaap du Preez and I checked our counting procedure of the day once again. We were very sure of the numbers; we had counted fifteen, over and over.At 03h00 the next morning I was contacted again by radio. The TAC HQ informed me that the medical staff at the HAA had found fifteen unique bones, which affirmed the count was correct. Relief washed over me.

In Memoriam — let us be quiet for a moment: The three crew members of the South African Air Force: Captain John Twaddle; Lieutenant Chris Pietersen and; Flight Engineer Sergeant Grobbies Grobbelaar. The twelve paratrooper national servicemen of 1 Parachute Battalion: Corporal Esuas Lombaard (20); Lance-Corporal Stephen Hoare (20); Rifleman Andre Wolmerans (21); Rifleman Grant Krull (20); Rifleman Craig Moody (20); Rifleman Andries Hermias van Niekerk (20); Rifleman Anton Kruger (22); Rifleman Martin le Roux (22); Rifleman James Marshall (20); Rifleman Alan de Klerk (19); Rifleman Shane Patrick Mallon (21) and; Rifleman Ruffle Hilton-Barret (21).

In later years I came across the following message on an internet site: “3 April 2009. My brother died in Angola together with 12 parabats and 2 more pilots on 9 August 1982. Chris Pietersen I still miss you and love you to bits. Your sis.” As darkness settled over the leaguer, some of it also settled in the souls of the one thousand soldiers of 61 Mech who became the lone victims of their own apprehensions and thoughts once again.”On 9 Aug 1988: 84276195BG Lance Corporal Raymond Victor Jagga, an Ops Medic from the Central Medical Command was assigned to F Squadron School of Armour and attached to 61 Mechanised Brigade. A ceasefire had been called between South Africa, Cuba and Angola but SWAPO/PLAN was not a signatory to this agreement. While returning from Ops Harwet, the convoy was attacked in Northern Owamboland by four SWAPO/PLAN insurgents using Soviet RPG-7 Anti-Tank Rockets. He was Killed in Action when his Ratel was struck by two of these rockets. The first rocket hit the engine while the second rocket penetrated through the side of the vehicle just below one of the windows and rifle ports where it exploded, killing him instantly. He was 19.”

 

 

MEDIA COLLAGE OF THE SOUTH WEST AFRICA BORDER WAR

(Most pictures sourced from   Anton Larkins. We thank him for posting so many good memories on his “Battle Buddies” FB page ) 

In this media collage we bring the day-to-day activities of the South African soldier during the South West Africa border/Bush war to you to commemorate our unsung heroes (White, Black, Indian and colored) that fought a bitter battle for more than 25 years – only to be sold out behind their backs by treacherous political  serpents the likes of John Vorster, FW De Klerk, Roelf Meyer, Dawie De Villiers , Constant Viljoen, Tienie Groenewald and many, many more dirty politicians , liberals and Jews . Today the communist scum in control conveniently want you to forget about these unsung heroes that bravely fought and triumphed against 5 of the most powerful and advanced nations of the world and 7 so-called “Freedom Fighters”– of which this same ANC scum that now play the “democratic government”– was one.

Those boys and girls- ages between 18 and 25- handled some of the most advanced technology, piloted helicopters, fighter jets,  transport aircraft , advanced armored vehicles , acted as doctors, engineers, paratroopers, reconnaissance experts, weapons experts, chefs, superb soldiers , nurses and much more. AND they distinguished themselves well above the call of duty  when pitted against the best the greedy corporate world could offer. Those boys were part of a once proud Defense Force-rated by Jane’s Weekly as the best bush fighters in the world who even outclassed and scared the sh*ts out of the Chinese, Russians, Americans and Cubans on the battlefield-  and not like the shameless rag-tag rubble that calls themselves a “Defense Force ” today- useless Affirmative Action  eaters that do not even remotely resemble even a shadow of those young chaps . BUT  their brave names and actions will be remembered alongside the role of honor of  great battles where South African heroes fought such as the Boer wars and Second World war. WE  SALUTE YOU!!!! 

We are sure our South West African bush  war veterans still alive today will immediately recognize  and associate themselves with the videos and pictures below- for it was their life they lived during those 25 long years ( Please take note NO Jews ever participated in this war- they all languished in jails (DB’s) and skulked behind the money of their powerful parents rather than stood up for the country they helped to plunder and hand over to the same communists these boys were forced to  fight against)

 

 

 

"So much owed to so few by so many" S.A.D.F Tribute Soldiers Of The Glorious South African Army.

Posted by Byron Whitehead on Monday, April 22, 2019

 

https://www.facebook.com/cyberjerk.ingram/videos/2429158117153798/?t=2

Rhodesia – External Operations

Rhodesia – External Operations

Posted by The Rhodesian Air Force Pictures on Saturday, March 23, 2019

Martyrs To The Cause….SADF"We shall act as our own conscience dictates because we and not they will be answerable to history. And I claim in the ranks of our excellent legions march!! The mighty ghosts of South Africa's past and their strong arms around us and their voices eco down the ages they say…… Vorentoe!!!!"Ons Vir Jou Suid Afrika.

Posted by Stander Okhrana on Thursday, December 17, 2015

 

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AT the age of 22 these boys already were hardened veterans in the art of modern warfare. How many of today’s junk generation of X-Box snowflakes can say the same?

AND then there was the heroes that never came back for whom the last bugle sounded….they are still out there on patrol.

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Today 28 years ago Major Martin Geldenhuys left us. (Picture: Martin is standing on the left with belt) RIP Major! 17 Aug 1991: 80544232PE Major Harper Martin Geldenhuys from 32 Battalion was accidentally killed at Pomfret while making a video of a C-47 Dakota as it was taking off from the runway. He was standing on the end of the runway and as the aircraft passed overhead, the aircraft tail wheel struck him on the head, killing him instantly. He was 26. (He was the son of General Jannie . J. Geldenhuys).

Fireforce

Fireforce

Posted by The Rhodesian Air Force Pictures on Saturday, December 29, 2018

SADF Veterans great clip to watch

Posted by SA Army pictures on Thursday, September 7, 2017

 

A Tribute To The South African Army (S.A.D.F)"South Africa Expects That All Will Do Their Duties"Ons Vir Jou Suid Afrika.

Posted by Stander Okhrana on Wednesday, November 4, 2015

SEE MORE BUSH WAR PICTURES ON:

 

https://za.pinterest.com/pin/335870084700091439/feedback/?invite_code=70457b64f7a046219798ff433a00a9fc&sender_id=813814732573284713

 

Another memoir read:

” Last night marked the end of the fighting in Angola when at 17h00 on the 8th of August 1988 hostilities came to an end. Maybe it did, but I don’t remember it making much news at all. I believe in making peace, pursuing peace, insisting on peace. But this was a shameful peace. We South Africans have the morbid habit of negotiating an outright defeat for ourselves whenever we have as good as won. I saw the withdrawal from South West Africa afterwards with my own eyes. Columns of military equipment in a succession of convoys down the southern highway clear across the desert from horizon to horizon. 1,400 km, all the way from Windhoek toe Pretoria. This was not a negotiated ceasefire. It was just a political rout that was camouflaged to look like a military ceasefire. It eventually proved to be a total defeat – an unmitigated surrender.

I was too young at the time to understand what a uniquely historical event I was witnessing. It must have been the most dignified, yet the most catastrophic rout in our country’s history. It tipped a chain of dominoes that would run all the way from the Kunene and onward into every freedom-loving home in South Africa. I met a stranger in a shop once who told me in what helter-skelter they evacuated their military base in South West Africa. His name was Herman Grobler. He said they were were under the strictest orders to bring nothing back in person. The Military Police made sure to go through the belongings of every single soldier who left the base. All souvenirs were confiscated. The army took with them what it could – but in their haste, much of it was just thrown haphazardly onto trucks. At one point he noticed a sergeant who had taken down the base’s national flag. The sergeant walked to the truck and disdainfully threw the flaw up onto the heap of objects as thought it was just another piece of furniture.

At this point, the young soldier shot the sergeant a murderous look, climbed onto the truck, and defiantly retrieved the flag. He – an unknown young troopie – was the only one who thought about his country’s honor in that moment. And so our country’s flag was brought back home on the initiative of a private, smuggled in his kit bag in order to keep it safe. To me that seemed indicative of the political mindset at that time. They were told to leave behind what they couldn’t take. In particular, the medical facilities were to be left intact for the use of the local community. The moment the last man left the base, he said, and the boom was lowered – the locals rushed into the base in one black wave – and it all went up in dust and chaos. The medical facilities were looted, torn to pieces, and carried away into the bush. It was the story of Africa all over again.

History teaches us that when you think you can trade land for peace, you always end up purchasing a slow-motion defeat that will not only deprive you of your border territories, but which will ultimately rob you of everything you own, right up to your very own home. Trading land for peace is not a method of negotiation. It is a method of surrender. It is the strategy of losers. We fought communism for 23 years, thinking in order to win we had to defeat it at our borders. It never seriously occurred to us that we had to defeat it in our own hearts first. It never crossed our minds that the  first to join the enemy would have been our own top leaders. Democracy failed us in the worst possible way. We put our trust in men, and proved how unreliable they were. We are a lesson to the entire world. Israel, America and Britain would do well to remember this date, and the consequences of it and take it as a warning for themselves. We have already lost, but they still stand before the same perilous choices. Salute to the 2,500 men and women who lost their lives in the fight to keep South Africa free for more than 20 years. The sacrifices made were not in vain. It made a difference.”

 

For the young boys out there who never went to the army:

When you happen to come across some older men telling their army stories, you might laugh or sneer at the “old toppies talking army” again, but pause for a moment, look at their faces and you may just see that small tear forming, the slight tremble of a lip or that sad look in their eyes then consider this; They went to the army not by choice but by conscription. They went in at an early age – many at 17. Just out of school. Birthdays were not spent with Mommy and Daddy and friends in celebration-  but most likely training, in the bush or busy with something military. And birthdays were forgotten.

They built a Brotherhood which outshines any friendship. This Brotherhood came from seeing and experiencing things that youngsters of that age were not yet supposed to experience.
Death, fear, exhaustion, pain, hunger, wet, tired. You name it, they experienced it. Many of them on a daily basis. Newly made friends died. Friends that became closer than your own family because your very lives depended on each other. Those that did not do battle had their own experiences that took years off their lives as well. When we talk about “our time in the army”, it’s because we are proud to have won our families just that little extra freedom, and because it soothes the soul. As we get older, these things catch up on us, and distant memories sometimes come flooding back bringing along with them the smells, sounds and sometimes the horrors. So, next time you have a giggle about the” ballies chatting about the old times, “-spare a thought for those youngsters that never got to your age because they paid the ultimate price so that you could enjoy today. And lastly, spare a special thought for their parents that never had the privilege of seeing them grow up and have families of their own.

Saluut aan elke Parabat wat op 4 Mei 1978 by Cassinga geveg het. Ons buig ons hoofde in eerbied aan die vier helde wat daardie dag gesterf "lost but not forgotten"

Posted by Theo van der Walt on Saturday, May 4, 2019

 

SOURCE:

 

White Nation

 

This will send shivers down your spine if you were there

Posted by Ian Baker on Friday, December 13, 2013

 

 

 

 

 

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